1,001 Movies – Week 12

“Atlantic City” to “The Bad and the Beautiful”

 

 

Atlantic City (1980) – The best 1980’s movie about America was not made by an American. Louis Malle knows and shows his stuff here. The themes are historically universal – change with times or die. The film opens with the implosion of one of the old great hotels of Atlantic City. Gambling has been made legal, room is needed for casinos. The two Oscar-nominated stars are breathtaking in their beautiful contrasts. The young vivacious Susan Sarandon, studying to be a dealer, and the aging powerful gangster, Burt Lancaster, getting ready for the last big one. Into their mutual lives rolls one heck of an opportunity. 1980 was a big year for film; this was one of the best ones. (KWR)

 

Babe (1995) – Based on the wonderful Dick King-Smith children’s book, this film will make you believe that a pig can talk! This is one of the best family films of all time and I find it odd that it came from the creator of Mad Max, George Miller. I always loved Saint-Saëns’ Symphony No. 3, so it was lovely to hear words set to it – especially as performed by James Cromwell. I love this movie to pieces. Every time I see it, it just makes me happy. See it and be happy too. (GS)

 

Babes in Toyland (1934) – It wouldn’t be the holidays without seeing Stan and Ollie in this classic. The Disney version has its moments, but doesn’t compare. Color or B&W, this is a must. (KCL)

 

Back to the Future (1985) – Amiable, hugely popular time-travel yarn that tapped into the nostalgia boon of the mid-80’s. Fox and Lloyd are terrific in the central roles and the whole thing has a sweet quality that neither of the sequels could quite match. (KT)

 

The Bad and the Beautiful (1952) – Ever wonder why Hollywood mogul-types are the way they are, and how they got that way? Kirk Douglas explains it all for you. (KCL)

 

Originally published in Raspberry World – Volume 2, Issue 1 (June/July 2007) 

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